Select country
Mission For Vision, India

Meghalaya in the North East of India is a state plagued with issues relating to poverty, illiteracy and health care; in particular a lack of awareness concerning eye health. Eye health care in the state is provided by the government and NGOs, however these services are decidedly inadequate for the needs of the population of close to 3 million.

For the last 3 years, Mission for Vision (MFV) has been partnering with the Society for Promotion of Eye Care and Sight (SPECS), the...

Meghalaya in the North East of India is a state plagued with issues relating to poverty, illiteracy and health care; in particular a lack of awareness concerning eye health. Eye health care in the state is provided by the government and NGOs, however these services are decidedly inadequate for the needs of the population of close to 3 million.

For the last 3 years, Mission for Vision (MFV) has been partnering with the Society for Promotion of Eye Care and Sight (SPECS), the charitable wing of the Bansara Eye Care Centre. This partnership has provided eye health care access to 300,000 people of which 32,000 received eye health intervention.

Vision Technicians (VTs) are integral in the plan to eliminate avoidable blindness. They are first-line midlevel eye care professional trained in the techniques of primary eye care. They are based at primary eye clinics, also known as Vision Centres (VCs) which are located in remote parts of the state under the supervision of the eye hospital.

WEN Giving is proud to partner with MFV by sponsoring two young women from Meghalaya to be trained as VTs at the LV Prasad Eye Institute, a highly reputed training centre in Hyderabad. The sponsorship includes tuition and lodging fees for the duration of the one-year course.

Upon completion the VTs will return to Meghalaya to provide eye health care in their community where they will be able to diagnose common eye conditions, provide some intervention and prescribe spectacles, refer patients to the local eye hospital as well as provide eye health education to the community. The course also equips these young women with skills that will provide them with lifelong employment and a better quality of life.

Meet our first two trainees:

Marbalin Wanniang

Name Marbalin Wanniang2

Bariskhem Lyngkhoi

Name Bariskhem Lyngkhoi

Bhutan Eye Hospital

In October 2016, Dr Ruit was recognised by the “Asia Game Changers” Asia Society awards in the United Nations, New York, for his work worldwide, including this new project. 

Bhutan Eye Hospital aims to replicate and export the Tilganga Institute of Ophthalmology model for community eye hospitals; a community centre with a treatment plan that was developed, and proven, to provide affordable, sustainable and effective eye care to poor communities in low-resource areas.  This...

In October 2016, Dr Ruit was recognised by the “Asia Game Changers” Asia Society awards in the United Nations, New York, for his work worldwide, including this new project. 

Bhutan Eye Hospital aims to replicate and export the Tilganga Institute of Ophthalmology model for community eye hospitals; a community centre with a treatment plan that was developed, and proven, to provide affordable, sustainable and effective eye care to poor communities in low-resource areas.  This model has been successfully implemented at Hetauda Community Eye Hospital in Nepal. 

285 million people in the world are visually impaired and can see less than 3 metres. 39 million of these are completely blind. 90% of visually impaired and blind people live in developing countries; and two-thirds of these are women.

Blindness and visual impairment are treatable in 4 out of five cases. Unfortunately, millions of poor people in developing countries lack access to affordable eye care. This is a particular problem in Asia and Africa. WEN Giving is pleased to be the foundation partner for this in Bhutan project with Dr Sanduk Ruit of Tilganga and the Himalayan Cataract Project of the USA.

Enjoy the Ground Breaking Ceremony.

Hue Province, Vietnam

Almost 70% of Vietnam’s population lives in rural villages where blindness often goes untreated. Many people living in these areas don’t realise that cataract blindness is treatable and their sight can be restored with a simple operation. Cataracts cause 71% of blindness in central Vietnam, but the area is extremely under-resourced and has inadequate eye care services.

Recently, major metropolitan hospitals and private eye centres in Ho Chi Minh City and Hanoi have improved the...

Almost 70% of Vietnam’s population lives in rural villages where blindness often goes untreated. Many people living in these areas don’t realise that cataract blindness is treatable and their sight can be restored with a simple operation. Cataracts cause 71% of blindness in central Vietnam, but the area is extremely under-resourced and has inadequate eye care services.

Recently, major metropolitan hospitals and private eye centres in Ho Chi Minh City and Hanoi have improved the quality of their eye care services and made access easier.

The WEN Giving foundation supported the Fred Hollows Foundation's programme in Hue Province from 2006-2009. The community-based eye care network was established with Hue Eye Hospital and the surrounding four districts. The programme provides eye care equipment and facilities, as well as surgical and technical training for ophthalmologists.

Kalimpong Eye Camp, India

The Nepal Eye Program was officially launched in July 1992 to support the prevention and control of blindness in Nepal and the region.
In the early years, working with The Fred Hollows Foundation (FHF) Australia, the Tilganga Institute of Ophthalmology (TIO) played a key role to help refine and adapt a practical, safe and affordable technique of intraocular lens implant for cataract surgery in developing countries.
In October 2016, the Tilganga team went to the Kalimpong region in...

The Nepal Eye Program was officially launched in July 1992 to support the prevention and control of blindness in Nepal and the region.
In the early years, working with The Fred Hollows Foundation (FHF) Australia, the Tilganga Institute of Ophthalmology (TIO) played a key role to help refine and adapt a practical, safe and affordable technique of intraocular lens implant for cataract surgery in developing countries.
In October 2016, the Tilganga team went to the Kalimpong region in India to operate on patients with a range of eye surgery requirements.
Please explore these two stories of ladies with bilateral cataracts that had left them totally blind. WEN Giving foundation is thrilled to support these types of Tilganga initiatives and the impact they have on changing the lives of not just the individual but also their family.

Photos by ©Michael Amendolia for The Fred Hollows Foundation www.hollows.org

Quang Ngai Eye Centre, Vietnam

Our friends at the Fred Hollows Foundation introduced us to the Quang Ngai Eye Centre project whose dream was to build a substantial new eye centre in the very poor central province of rural Vietnam. WEN Giving became a significant construction partner in the project with the Vietnamese government and the Fred Hollows Foundation; and the new building opened in July 2010 and provides a level of care that is changing lives daily.

Our friends at the Fred Hollows Foundation introduced us to the Quang Ngai Eye Centre project whose dream was to build a substantial new eye centre in the very poor central province of rural Vietnam. WEN Giving became a significant construction partner in the project with the Vietnamese government and the Fred Hollows Foundation; and the new building opened in July 2010 and provides a level of care that is changing lives daily.

Outreach Mobile Eye Camps

Many people with preventable blindness live in poor, remote and hard-to-reach areas of Asia. WEN Giving funded a four-wheel drive vehicle that’s used for outreach mobile eye camps in Nepal, India and Bhutan. The vehicle allows surgical teams from the Tilganga Institute of Ophthalmology in Kathmandu to provide eye care to remote communities which would otherwise have been inaccessible. Many patients walk for up to two days to receive their sight-restoring cataract surgery.

Many people with preventable blindness live in poor, remote and hard-to-reach areas of Asia. WEN Giving funded a four-wheel drive vehicle that’s used for outreach mobile eye camps in Nepal, India and Bhutan. The vehicle allows surgical teams from the Tilganga Institute of Ophthalmology in Kathmandu to provide eye care to remote communities which would otherwise have been inaccessible. Many patients walk for up to two days to receive their sight-restoring cataract surgery.

Tilganga Hospital, Kathmandu

In Nepal, around 4% of people aged 45 and older are blind. For many of these people, their blindness is either preventable or curable.

In impoverished nations such as Nepal, the effect of blindness deepens the poverty cycle. Often a blind person is unable to work forcing other family members to stay home and care for them, taking two incomes out of a household. Nepal has about 110 trained ophthalmologists; a ratio of one ophthalmologist to 230,000 patients. This is one tenth of the...

In Nepal, around 4% of people aged 45 and older are blind. For many of these people, their blindness is either preventable or curable.

In impoverished nations such as Nepal, the effect of blindness deepens the poverty cycle. Often a blind person is unable to work forcing other family members to stay home and care for them, taking two incomes out of a household. Nepal has about 110 trained ophthalmologists; a ratio of one ophthalmologist to 230,000 patients. This is one tenth of the recommended ratio of 1 to 25,000.

Since 2009, WEN Giving has funded scholarships for 14 doctors to undertake specialist ophthalmology training in Nepal’s Tilganga Institute of Ophthalmology.

The Institute’s director, Dr Sanduk Ruit, was trained by Australian eye care pioneer Professor Fred Hollows. Thanks to these scholarships, more Nepalese ophthalmologists will be trained, helping to reduce the number of patients with preventable cataract blindness in Nepal. And, in time, these ophthalmologists will teach the next generation helping improve the country’s ophthalmologist-to-patient ratio. Meet some of our scholars here.

Dr Ben Limbu

Dr Ben Limbu

Dr Ben Limbu is currently working at Tilganga as an oculoplastic surgeon. He regularly heads eye camps in rural areas of Nepal. 

Dr Angira Shrestha

Dr Angira Shrestha 2007 2010

Dr Angira Shrestha is completing her fellowship at the University of Washington, Seattle, WA. 

Dr Sushuma Duwal

Dr Sushma Duwal 2008 2011

Dr Sushma Duwal is working at Tilganga as a general ophthalmologist and is currently undergoing her fellowship in vitro retina from Tilganga.

Dr Rachana Singh Rana

Dr Rachana Singh 2008 2011

Dr Rachana Singh Rana is working at Tilganga as a cornea specialist and performs cornea as well as cataract surgeries regularly. 

Dr Shyam Vyas

Dr Shyam Vyas 2009 2012

Dr Shyam Vyas just completed his tenure as chief doctor at the Hetauda Community Eye Hospital where patients mostly came from marginalized communities in the Southern part of Nepal. He has now started working at Tilganga again as a general ophthalmologist and plans to pursue a fellowship in cataract.

Dr Malita Amatya

Dr Malita Amatya 2009 2012

Dr Malita Amatya is working at Tilganga as a general ophthalmologist and manages the emergency department of the hospital. She also participates in teaching at the training program in the hospital.

Dr Smita Shrestha

Dr Smita Shrestha

Dr Smita Shrestha is now working at Hetauda Community Eye Hospital as the Chief doctor.  She is a Uveitis specialist and looks after the overall management of the hospital which is visited by 200 patients every day.

Dr Sanjeeb Bhandari

Dr Sanjeeb Bhandari 2009 2012

Dr Sanjeeb Bhandari works at Tilganga as a general Ophthalmologist. Through the hospital he attends many free eye camps in rural parts of Nepal.

Dr Anil Gurung

Dr Anil Gurung 2010 2013

Dr Anil Gurung is working at Geta Eye Hospital in the far western part of Nepal. He plans to pursue a fellowship in Oculoplastic. 

Dr Bandana Khanal

Dr Bandana Khanal 2010 2013

Dr Bandana Khanal is working at Ramlal Golchhha Eye Hospital in Biratnagar which is in the South East of Nepal. 

Dr Ashma Manandhar

Dr Ashma Manandhar 2010 2013

Dr Ashma Manandhar is completing a fellowship at the Janaki Eye Hospital in Janakpar, located on the border of India.  She frequently attends eye camps in the southern rural parts of Nepal.

FELLOWSHIP SCHOLARS

In 2017, WEN Giving visited the hospital again and discussed supporting two of the scholars into Fellowships – Dr Sunil Thakali in Comprehensive Ophthalmology and Dr Rojeeta Parajuli in Paediatric Ophthalmology. 

Dr Sunil Thakali

Dr Sunil Thakali 2016 Fellowship Nominee

Through WGf, Dr Sunil completed his fellowship in comprehensive ophthalmology at Tilganga. He currently works at the Hetauda Community Eye Hospital serving a 5-year tenure.

Dr Rojeeta Parajuli

Dr Rojeeta Parajuli 2008 2011

Dr Rojeeta Parajuli is currently working at Tilganga as a paediatric ophthalmologist and through WGf has recently completed her fellowship in paediatric ophthalmology.